DIALOGUE 2-3: ASKING DIRECTIONS » Luyện thi Gò Vấp
Course Content
Everyday Conversations: Learning American English
Everyday Conversations is intended for sixth- and seventh-grade students of English as a Foreign Language (EFL) or English as a Second Language (ESL). Students can listen to and/or read dialogues in English. Topics of the conversations include introductions and small talk, shopping, asking for directions, hobbies, and giving advice.
0/15
Leisure Activities
0/1
English Level 1
Small conversation/Dialogue
0/2
Practice Listening
0/1
Learning English Conversation
Bài học

MARK: Excuse me. Could you tell me where the library is?

NANCY: Yes, it’s that way. You go three blocks to Washington Street, then turn right. It’s on the corner, across from the bank.

MARK: Thanks! I’ve only been in town a few days, so I really don’t know my way around yet.

NANCY: Oh, I know how you feel. We moved here a year ago, and I still don’t know where everything is!

LANGUAGE NOTES
  •  Could you tell me … is slightly more polite than “Can you tell me …?”

  •  Could you tell me where the library is? Notice that “library” is stressed here because it is the word with the important information. This is an indirect question, so the subject (the library) comes before the verb (is). The word order is reversed in a direct question (Where is the library?).

  •  Yes, it’s that way. Notice the stress on “that.” The speaker is pointing in a certain direction and wants to emphasize that direction.

  •  I know how you feel is a way of saying “I understand.” Notice the emphasis on “feel.” The speaker wants to show empathy and understanding.

  •  I still don’t know where everything is! Notice the word order of where “everything is.” The subject (everything) comes before the verb (is). This word order is different from the direct question (Where is everything?).

vi